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Patio in Progress

One of these days, I’ll remember to take before pictures. In this case, it would have shown an uneven pit of clay, dirt and rotting leaves languishing next to our hot tub. So picture that as the starting point. With the help of my very motivated MIL, we’ve taken some big steps towards my vision for that mud pit:

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This is post raking, covering with weed barrier and filling with 30 bags (150 cubic feet) of paver base. We went extra thick with it so it could also level the ground w/o the need for digging. As you can see, there’s some work to go—more pavers needed and then we’ll fill in between with pea gravel. The now firepit will receive a coat of hammered copper paint and find new life as a garden/focal point. The bar at the end will remain a bar, of course. :) Here’s a closer look:

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Looking forward to wrapping this up, as it’s my one big yard project for the season. Ok, that and the stone fire circle, but that’s already checked off the list: 

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It’s like we get to camp in our own backyard, except instead of crawling into a tent when we leave the fire, we curl up in pillow-top, king size goodness. With no bugs. 

Hoosier Mama?

Finally! The hoosier that moved into our garage, patiently waiting for a face lift, before we moved into this house, now has it’s rightful place in our kitchen:

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My baking corner! And my wine corner. Given my lack of baking affinity, it is best to keep these close together. I almost gave up on those original  handles, they were caked with decades of kitchen grease and grime. I’m so glad I decided they were worth some elbow grease and TLC. 

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So, why did it take SO long to put this cabinet in its rightful place? One, the garage was a disaster zone long after we’d settled into the rest of the house. I simply couldn’t get to the hoosier to start my project.

Two, it involved more than a coat of paint. Originally, the doors had a center panel that had a PA dutch style tulip stencil. But not in a good way. There was also scalloped edging under the cabinet doors, way to country kitchen for me. Here’s some pics between before and after (I neglected to take pics early on):

Luckily, organizing the garage motivated my husband to bust out his tools, so he happily jigsawed off the unwanted elements of the hoosier. From there, all it needed was primer, chicken wire, custom paint (me mixing random colors in an old yogurt container), a staple gun, shelf liner…ok, a lot went into this. And we are so happy with the end result!   Extra storage, a vintage meets modern feel and a piece that we can both look at as a labor of love. It’s amazing what we can accomplish in a year and a half when we work as a team. ;-)  

And After (from bullets to bench)

I’m really happy with how the ammunition box upcycle went.  Here’s the final product:

To get the height, we measured where other deck chairs fell and made my son pretend sit on it as we held it just to be sure (that part wasn’t very scientific, but it was funny to watch).  After putting the legs on each side, we decided crossbars that connected the legs and cradled the box would add some extra support.  End result is a rustic look that I like, plus it serves double duty as storage and cost next to nothing:

  • Ammunition Box - $5 at yard sale
  • Spray Paint - $1 at ReStore (aka, best place on earth for scavengers)
  • Poly - $0 left by previous homeowner
  • Legs - $0 found wood as we cleaned the garage, prob from previous owner

So, under $10 for our new “custom” bench.  Plus, was nice bonding for the hubby & I.  The parts involving power tools were all him!  I’m the scavenger & idea person. :)  Ok, time to go test out the new bench.  Have to see if it can hold my weight along with a frosty Hoptober.  (Yikes, is it REALLY time for fall beers already???)

In Over My Bed

How did my son end up sleeping on a foam mattress, on the floor for the last year?  The story starts with a teen boy who wanted to upgrade from a twin to a full size bed.  And a doting grandmother ready to buy him the bed of his choice, on one condition: he had to clean his room first.  

Please understand, this was no normal undertaking.  This is a child who would rather sleep with a dirty dish hidden under a pillow than have it be seen and have to wash it.  I exaggerate, but barely.  Still, he seemed eager for the carrot on the end of the stick.  I listed his bed on Craigslist and found a buyer for the frame, but not the mattress.  

Bed BeforeFast forward a year and a new house later.  The mess has moved with him.  Sloth has won over comfort.  A thrift store find has me trying a new tactic.  Buy the bed and he will come around. 

This headboard is very similar to the $400 one that he wanted from Ikea.  Except that it is decades older, a washed out yellow color and $35.   Um, sold.   I’d even just picked up some dark gray spray paint at ReStore the other day.  Deal!  We’ll still Ikea-bound for the mattress, though, courtesy of doting grandmother.

He’s been eager to move the project along, helping to sand and paint.  However, his design vision means that there are parts I need to do and it’s become a multiday project.  

Here’s where we are so far.  Main color is charcoal gray.  Inside cabinets and the doors are black— the black is all chalkboard paint, so my doodle-happy son can write on it.  We’ll be getting new knobs.  The trim that remains yellow will eventually be the same red that I’ve done the top strip.  I just need more tape and patience to finish that part.  I’ll get on it as soon as that room is clean…

Buzzed glazing is drunk glazing! In the end, this is all my fault. I over-trusted and under-thought.  We had a friend over for dinner, which included a few glasses of a yummy cab.  Afterwards, I somehow convinced everyone to hang in the garage with me so I could resume applying glaze to the table legs.  Dinner guest says he has never glazed before & could he try it.  This is a guy who finished his own basement and knows his way around a DIY project.
Yet, this picture is how the story ends.  DG thought it looked great glopped on and that I was silly for wiping it off and, well, following the directions.  He was even sneaking back and adding glaze to the legs I’d already done.  Lesson? When your “winey” friend ask to help with a project he’s never even heard of before, just say NO.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS
ISO
320
Aperture
f/2.8
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
35mm

Buzzed glazing is drunk glazing! In the end, this is all my fault. I over-trusted and under-thought. We had a friend over for dinner, which included a few glasses of a yummy cab. Afterwards, I somehow convinced everyone to hang in the garage with me so I could resume applying glaze to the table legs. Dinner guest says he has never glazed before & could he try it. This is a guy who finished his own basement and knows his way around a DIY project.

Yet, this picture is how the story ends. DG thought it looked great glopped on and that I was silly for wiping it off and, well, following the directions. He was even sneaking back and adding glaze to the legs I’d already done. Lesson? When your “winey” friend ask to help with a project he’s never even heard of before, just say NO.

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